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Kevin
Jan 28, 2020

Pitfalls in hiring the Tech Talent

Hiring is a time-consuming process. Hiring managers undergo a rigorous process to identify the ideal candidate. However, what if despite all the efforts, they get it all wrong? According to a survey, a technology company could lose an average of $15,000 for a single bad hire. When it comes to workplace mistakes, hiring the wrong resource can be worse than poor performance.

Recruiting the perfect tech talent is unarguably the most critical aspect of a business. Finding the right talent is not easy, especially when it comes to tech talent. To make sure that you make the right decisions, you have to consider a plethora of factors to improve recruitment efficacy.

In the contemporary tech-driven world, finding optimal staffing solutions can be extremely vexing, especially, for companies in the IT industry. Hiring top IT talent is imperative for organizational growth and success, which is why exceptional IT professionals are high in demand and rare to find.

If you are looking to recruit the top tech talent, to start a new team, or add another member to your existing organization, here are some of the common mistakes most recruiters make and the ways to avoid them:

Pitfall # 1: Formulating incorrect job descriptions

The most common and greatest mistakes recruiters make is, failing to define job descriptions correctly. Especially in the IT industry, hiring the finest tech talent in the market requires you to be very specific about what you need. In contrast with management or any other field, IT experts are specialized professionals with a very particular set of skills.

If you want your company to be on top, you need to ensure that the hiring process is tuned at every end. It is crucial for your hiring process to attract the correct fit for your business right from the beginning. It’s a common practice to rush into interviews without formulating correct job roles and requirements picking up candidates through their resumes on LinkedIn or other portals.

Imagine making a product without understanding client requirements? There is no logic to this equation. The same goes for hiring. Hiring a professional who doesn’t have the skills necessary for the job can only lead to undesirable outcomes. Hiring managers need to explicitly understand the job roles and requirements before assessing potential recruits.

The solution:

What you need to do here is to review the job role and requirements for the position carefully, before choosing a candidate. Then look at the candidate’s previous experiences and evaluate if they are aligned with current job requirements. Ensure that every relevant authority agrees with the information provided for reviewing candidates, so there are no uncertainties left – get every stakeholder on onboard.

You can also discuss the job role with someone who is working in a similar capacity. You might not be aware of what is actually required for the role. You can sort it out by talking to peers to get insights about the role. Also, develop a list of expectations that should be achieved within a timeframe. Now you have evaluation metrics to measure the candidate’s performance and skill.

Don’t completely rely on information that is present on the resume. It could portray that a candidate is right for the position, but that might not be true.

Pitfall # 2: Overcomplicating the process

Overcomplicating the recruitment process is a common mistake, recruiters make – driving the top tech talent away from their company. Hiring is a two-way process; while a hiring manager looks for the best fit, candidates also look for the right company. Hiring managers are usually focused on meeting the ends, i.e., hiring the right candidate. They don’t pay attention to the other side of the picture.

Everyone wants a top performer. Obviously, you would like to see your company grow towards success. Your company’s recruiting process is the first impression on potential candidates. An efficient process would attract candidates to join the organization.

Another factor that can hinder the recruitment process is a comprehensive evaluation. While it may be useful for certain positions, making it a ground-rule for all positions may lower recruitment efficiency. Each role needs a correlated evaluation method to improve the onboarding process.

The solution:

To avoid this particular pitfall, you need to understand the whole process. If you are interested in a highly talented candidate, then they are interested in you for sure. While you are going through their resume, they are doing the same for your company. This is the time when you will discover each other to find out if you can work together or not.

By following the correct process, you value their talent and time. Simplifying the process could make it easier. Revise the process. Drop unnecessary recruitment stages and improvise the process. Only keep the part that could help your team to select a candidate with minimal effort. You can use a questionnaire or use their work samples for the test rather than evaluating an individual on customary, standardized tests.

Pitfall # 3: Structure is the key

Once you shortlist a candidate, and they are ready to join your company. What’s next? Do you have a systemic process to execute the transition? Most of the hiring managers think that when the contract is signed, their job is done and dusted; however, this is wrong. That is the starting point.

What is the solution?

You must be thinking that an orientation program can be a correct move. In reality, it’s a lot more than just orientation.

The onboarding process should cover the candidate’s experience as a whole. You should revamp the process by keeping data and carrying out surveys. The orientation program should not be just a guide to café or emergency rules. It should include training courses, future planning, assessment programs, and introduction to leaders. These factors are equally important and fall under the banner of HR, whose responsibility is to take fresh talent onboard with utmost agility and professionalism.

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